Kroko Tactical, maybe not a well known name in the tactical world, but one that you can associate with quality and customer service.

Based in Croatia, and started in 1961, they live by their R.I.D.E. mantra, Research, Innovate, Develop, Enhance.  As a company that seems to be very customer service oriented, they are willing to spec out clothing, gear, camouflage, and materials to suit your needs.  Oh, and they’ll do this with small orders too.

I was sent a pair of camouflage pants to test.  Here are my first impressions, to be broken down further, later.  The camo pattern reminds me of multi-cam, only darker.  There are lots of pockets, I love me some pockets!  The material is on the heavier side, but it is also soft.  Sizing is HUGE!  I asked for a Medium, and got a Medium, but the numbers associated with this are 46-48, and from the top of the pants to the bottom is about 44”, way too big/long for my 5’11” 159 pound body.

So let’s get into the details, starting from the top down.  The belt loops are 2 1/8” between the top and bottom stitches, so they’ll easily fit common 1 3/4” and 2” web belts.  The pants are secured in front by four plastic buttons, a true button-up fly, and a shoelace drawstring on the inside.  Kind of like what you’d find on a pair of swim trunks.

In back, there is a pocket on each side that is 7” deep and secured by a flap and 5/8” velcro.  Overall, deep enough and secure enough to hold your wallet, gloves, chew, etc.

Going down the right leg, there are three pockets.  The first is the traditional slash pocket near the top of the pants that one puts car keys, chapstick in, etc.  The opening is 6 1/2” wide, and 8” deep.  The next pocket is the thigh pocket.  It has a slight forward cant, with an opening of about 9 1/2” and is about the same in depth at its deepest point.  It is secured by a traditional flap that has a 3/4” velcro male side, and a 1 1/4” fuzzy side.  The front part of the flap is stitched to the pocket.  The pocket also has a single bungee draw-string that can be used to pull the top of the pocket closed tighter.  The spring-loaded, plastic, retention device is attached to the pocket by shoelace material.  Inside this pocket are three, elastic loops, sewn to the inside of the pocket, to hold gear,  They measure 1”, 1 1/2”, 1”.  Going further down the leg, you have a calf pocket.  It is secured by a traditional flap, with 3/4” velcro.  The pocket is 4” wide, gusseted, and 7 1/2” deep.  There is a shoelace drawstring at the bottom opening of the leg.

Going down the left side, there are the same three pockets (slash, thigh, calf), with the same measurements.  The only difference is in the left thigh pocket.  Instead of the three elastic loops on the inside, you have another smaller pocket.  This pocket is secured by 5/8” velcro, and is about 4 1/2” wide and 4 1/2” deep.  The leg also has the shoelace drawstring at the bottom.

Materials

Overall the materials seem to be high quality.  As stated above, the pants material is heavier, so it should wear well.  Being softer, I appreciate it on my baby-soft skin.  It is definitely warmer in the winter, but in the Arizona heat, warmer in the summer too.  The velcro, shoelaces, bungee cord, buttons, and plastic retention device also seem to be good quality.

Sizing

I would definitely need a small, or possibly even an extra small.  The length is also super long.  The pants would need to be bloused, tailored, or tucked into the boots.  For reference, as stated above, I’m 5’11” and 159 pounds and wear a 32/34 in jeans and 5.11 pants.  The buttons don’t really offer anything by way of cinching up the pants, so you are left with the shoelace on the inside, and whatever belt you are using.  With a web belt on, I was able to cinch it tight enough to be comfortable, but there was excess material bunched up underneath the belt.  I didn’t even bother with the shoelace drawstring.  They were indeed too long, even with boots on, and I had quite the saggy butt going on.  Rest assured, these glutes are not saggy!

Functionality

The camo pattern I was given is a little on the dark side for the desert that I work/play in and around Tucson.  But with other choices available on their website, to include a true desert pattern, and their willingness to design a camo pattern for you, it’s just a matter of finding what’s best for your usage.

Pants securing.  I am not a fan of the buttons, nor the shoelace.  The shoelace is something narrow, and that will just dig into your body depending on how tight you tie it.  I would cut the ends off, or pull it our completely.  The buttons don’t seem to be secured with enough thread.  I’m no seamstress, but there appears to be 4 strands of thread running up and down on each side of the button.  I surmise it would be stronger if the thread attached the button in an “X” formation.  And from someone who wore Propper brand pants for years on SWAT before we transitioned to 5.11 pants, the buttons will be ripped off.  I would rather see a traditional zipper and snap.  We bloused our Propper pants for years, and most of us cut off or pulled out the ties at the bottom and just used old-school blousing bands.  But if you like to tie them, the shoelace will suffice.

The pockets are my favorite thing about these pants, kind of.  I like that there are nine to  choose from.  Here’s what I don’t like, some of this is individual to me, some of it is functionality.  Back pockets, no issues.  Front, top pockets no issues.  The thigh pockets, I’ve got some issues.  First, the bungee cord.  I get it, but I don’t understand it.  I think the velcro is heavy duty enough, and the pockets deep enough that you don’t need the bungee cord and plastic retention device.  It looks weird, takes 2 hands to operate it when pulling it tight, and is another thing to break or get caught on something.      Seems gimmicky.  Dislike.

I also don’t like that the front part of the flap is secured to the pants, this prohibits you from being able to open the flap all the way.  The elastic loops inside the right thigh pocket I like, just not in that pocket.  My preference would be on the left side.  The loops can easily hold magazines or a tourniquet.  As one who carries both, in my left thigh pocket, this would be perfect to hold them in place.  Personal preference obviously, but for someone who is right handed, I’d be keeping my pistol in my strong hand while getting out a spare magazine or tourniquet with my left, hence me wanting those in the left pocket.  Inside the left thigh pocket I like the additional smaller and hidden pocket, I’d just want it in the right thigh pocket.  The calf pockets I like, I’ve never had pants with them.  My only concern is how wide they are.  I have little girl hands, and my hands barely fit inside to grab something.  I like my gloves super tight, and I struggle to get my hands in the pockets with gloves on.  So if you have man-hands, which is all of you out there, and do or don’t wear gloves, these pockets may or may not be useful.

In conclusion, this is overall not a bad pair of pants, quality wise.  Bagginess aside, they were even comfortable.  But I am not sure if they were comfortable because there were so baggy.  Would I buy a pair?  No.  Here are my reasons for not: shoelace drawstring at the top, button fly, sizing, frustrating thigh pockets, heavy material, and specific to this pair the camo pattern is too dark.  What I like most is the quality of materials used.

Ratings

Materials

4/5

Sizing/Fit

2/5

Functionality

3/5

Overall

3/5

Material Disclosure

I received this product as a courtesy from the manufacturer via Spotter Up so I could test it and give my honest feedback. I am not bound by any written, verbal, or implied contract to give this product a good review. All opinions are my own and are based off my personal experience with the product.

*The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the original authors and contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Spotter Up Magazine, the administrative staff, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

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