maxresdefaultHere’s something you should keep in your Bug-Out-Bag, Para cord. Online, there is a lot of precious information on how to use it. Simple searches on Youtube will show enthusiasts putting it to use. I recommend carrying at least 50 ft of it, more if you have the space. You simply should not go anywhere without it. Very strong, lightweight and a multiplicity of uses for it. Be certain that what you buy meets military specifications because some commercially available models may not be up to par for when you truly need it. The most commonly available cord found in practical use is the Type III and nominally rated with a minimum breaking strength of 550 lbs.

550 Cord bracelets have been popular with L.E.O’s and military. Today you’ll see many law enforcement and military family members and survivalist types wearing them. Bracelets can easily be unraveled in a last minute situation to utilize in your purposes. Good American made brands can be had for no more than $5.00. You can pick up 100’s of feet for cheap at many gun shows or similar events. Worth the cash spent.

They come in a variety of colors, qualities and styles. Nothing can beat something that is homemade. Your children and your spouse will treasure the one you made for them while you are deployed. Years later, these things become tokens of your concern for them, and are keepsakes for the generation after you.

I made one for each of my children and my wife.

  1. Bear bag Hang bag from tree
  2. Belt for trousers
  3. Bow drill for fire starting
  4. Braid / twist into a rope
  5. Clothesline
  6. Dental floss
  7. Dog collar
  8. Fence to secure animals in
  9. Fishing line
  10. Guy Lines for tent
  11. Hair tie
  12. Hammock
  13. Handcuffs or restraints
  14. Handle for a tool such as a knife
  15. Hatband
  16. Knots learn and make various knots for tying items
  17. Lanyard for key or tool
  18. Leash
  19. Net
  20. Pet collar
  21. Pet leash
  22. Pole lashing for fence or making a stretcher
  23. Pulley system
  24. Rappelling
  25. Repairing broken equipment
  26. Repairing zippers on bags
  27. Rifle sling
  28. Rope for many uses
  29. Rope ladder
  30. Sandal Straps
  31. Secure a flag to pole or other item
  32. Secure a splint
  33. Secure a tarp between trees
  34. Secure a tent or shelter
  35. Secure boat or skiff to tree
  36. Secure fire wood or sleeping bag
  37. Secure gear to a vehicle
  38. Secure Items to a backpack
  39. Sewing Thread
  40. Shoe laces
  41. Snare
  42. Snowshoes using branches
  43. Stitch a wound
  44. Suspenders
  45. Suspension for glow-stick or other tool
  46. Tie downs items to a vehicle roof rack
  47. Tourniquet
  48. Tripwire
  49. Watchband
  50. Weapon for lashing blade to stick

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About The Author

Mike credits his early military training as the one thing that kept him disciplined through the many years. He currently provides his expertise as an adviser for the DoD. Michael Kurcina subscribes to the Spotter Up way of life. “I will either find a way or I will make one”.

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