Spotter Up will assume “no” responsibility for any use or misuse of information from this article. This article alone will not make the reader a TACTICS expert or can it be used as a substitute for PROFESSIONAL TACTICAL TRAINING. Spotter Up advises you to visit our site for training courses with a certified instructor On ALL weapon platforms.

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TACTICS FOR THE UP AND COMING SWAT OFFICER

In this article we will give you the basic of all basics in Tactics. There is no “one way, or my way” to do tactics, its all based around Finding a Way and Making a Way.  The basic components of an officer is Trust, Surprise, Speed.

TRUST

The first letter in T-eam, and one of the main factors in surviving an operation.

SURPRISE

This component of an assault is easily gained but can be lost just as fast. You should be ready before you get the squeeze-up, before the door breaches, before the flashbang goes off and definitely before you take your first step. The bad guy knows you’re coming but doesn’t when or how. Surprise is your best friend. When the surprise hits the bad guy you have a very brief time, less than seconds, to make your entry, take the room and engage your threat.

SPEED

You can only move as fast as you can see and accurately shoot. You can only shoot as fast as you train yourself to shoot. Sometimes speed can be good and bad. The good is that you will be on top of the bad before he knows it. The bad is you may leave your team and wander in alone. You may move so fast that you over-penetrate or miss something. You are only as fast as the slowest team mate.

VIOLENCE OF ACTION

This is the last given opportunity for the bad guy to give up and give in. Remember when you are called out for an operation it has already gotten bad and violence is expected. The number of guns you have is not the overall recipe for violence of action. You combine TRUST, SURPRISE and SPEED and you have the ability and tools you need to neutralize any threat. Your mind-frame at that time is 90% of complete domination. Mastering the room clearing methods is essential and has a collective connection between all components. Without these components you will not achieve violence of action of a successful mission.

Depending on the frontage of a home you might not be able to choose what side of the door you stack up on. Sometimes there are impediments such as: furniture, bushes or a wall. It is very important to know whether a door opens inwards or outwards.

The door opens inwards. No matter what side of the door you stack on be sure to have a plan. Practice, practice practice.

Predetermined entry vs 1st man is never wrong

Some officers often are trained in pre-gaming on which way each man will move post breach. What you want to do may not be what you will do. You don’t know what’s on the other side of the door that will allow you to flow in using your predetermined game plan. The simplest way to make an entry is feed off the first man. If he goes left, the second man goes right and so on. The first man has a better eye on the door and should have determined the path of least resistance or which way the door opens. Once you determine which method of entry, then come’s speed. When it’s time to move, MOVE to get out of the FATAL FUNNEL. The first officer, then the second, must get in the room as quickly as possible to avoid being bogged down at the entry point. This will allow for a smooth entry for the team. If you stop in the door, or threshold, you risk fighting the battle alone and possibly being seriously injured. The fatal funnel is not always in the door it can be in the middle of a hallway or some other entry point. When you stop moving or your team can’t help you, you have found yourself in a fatal funnel.

Reading the door

In most cases when you see hinges the door will open toward you. If you don’t see the hinges the door will open inward and away. The door knob will tell you the obvious of where the locking mechanisms are and in which direction the door will move. If the door opens toward you the 1st officer will move toward the knob side. If the door opens inward the 1st officer will move toward the hinge side. We can’t say it enough; “mindset is key” because these observations are made within seconds, and will make the difference in surprise and speed.

The door opens inwards. No matter what side of the door you stack on be sure to have a plan. Practice, practice practice.

Depending on the frontage of a home you might not be able to choose what side of the door you stack up on. Sometimes there are impediments such as: furniture, bushes or a wall. It is very important to know whether a door opens inwards or outwards.

Immediate threat area

Each room has an area of responsibility for each officer. Once the door opens the first operator should decide which direction he will enter and which area/corner of the room is the immediate threat. The decision is based on how much of the room he has seen prior to entry and chosen to move to the majority of the room not cleared. Look for tables, closets, large chairs and cabinets that you cannot see around or thru, these also may be immediate threat areas.

SAME ROOM, FROM THE OPPOSITE SIDE: Our five man team now enters the room. Did they enter in a manner that allowed them to have the advantage? As they entered did they see the three scumbags in the room?

SAME ROOM, FROM THE OPPOSITE SIDE: Our five man team now enters the room. Did they enter in a manner that allowed them to have the advantage? As they entered did they see the three scumbags in the room?

Remember you are only as perfect as your practice. Train for survival not for defeat. Always think: WHATS MY NEXT MOVE?

FIND A WAY OR MAKE A WAY

 

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picture courtesy of: deadliestwarrior.wikia.com 

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About The Author

Tactics/Training Advisor

Sam has been in federal law enforcement for 6 years. During his brief time with his agency he was tasked to play an intricate role in the successful organization of a Tactical Response Team. He has trained with some of the top law enforcement agencies and shooting/tactics instructors in the US. His prior experience came from approx. 9 years of local law enforcement working in one of the top five most dangerous areas in America. Of those years, 7 were spent on the city SWAT Team, 2 years in Street Crimes and he spent hundreds of additional hours working DUI. Sam has over 200 tactical missions under his belt, and over 400 drug and warrant arrests. During his career in law enforcement he successfully completed and received several certifications to include: • Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy • Federal Law Enforcement Training Academy (FLETC) • NRA Law Enforcement handgun/shotgun Instructor • Basic Firearm Instructor • Basic Tactics Instructor • Law Enforcement Instructor Training Program • General Instructor • Rappel Master/Instructor • SWAT Level 1 Certification • Basic/Advanced SWAT Certification (Illinois State Police) • Active Shooter Response • Individual Protective Measures Training Program • Protective Service Operations Training Program • Dignitary and Witness Protection for Law Enforcement (LEGION) • High Risk Environmental Protection Program (LEGION) • First Aid/CPR/TCCC • Hand to hand assault/counter assault • Advanced defensive driving Sam was deployed to an active war zone for several months, where he was a team leader for motorcade movements while overseas in hostile territory. His responsibilities were scheduled pick-up/drop-offs, route recon, advanced firearms training and emergency Quick Response Force training for his team. Jay subscribes to the Spotter Up way of life. “I will either find a way or I will make one”.

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