Crossover 1

The image above clearly depicts the path the individual(s) will take to enter through the doorway. This room entry method is called the Crisscross; it has also been called the Crossover. The situation and environment should dictate which method is used for each independent room. There are many advantages and drawbacks when entering any room and as much information as can be ascertained should be done prior to entry. Is the suspect a barricaded defender, how large is the doorway, is complete penetration of the room necessary? There are many questions to ask.

Without getting too detailed, instead let’s keep it simple:

The Areas of Responsibility is apparent to the individual(s) attempting entry. The first person entering the doorway will cross to the opposite area from where he first began his room entry. The partner will cross over too and end at the opposite area from where he first began his room entry. The room should be entered quickly in order to stay well out of the fatal funnel.

“Operators” must be mindful to not run into their partner when making their room entry or running through the middle of the portal. Crossfire from the other person’s weapon is a possibility due to this kind of maneuvering; other issues might be a threat is visible but #1 operator is in the way. Generally a small micropause allows the threat to be engaged from the second person’s angle.

*Operator: Officer/Troop member.

Crossover

(Image courtesy of Medium.com)

Comments

comments

About The Author

Mike credits his early military training as the one thing that kept him disciplined through the many years. He currently provides his expertise as an adviser for the DoD. Michael Kurcina subscribes to the Spotter Up way of life. “I will either find a way or I will make one”.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.