My first experience with Eberlestock Packs was when I purchased their Gunslinger model, recommended to me by Clint Smith, prior to taking a High Angle Rifle class at Thunder Ranch Oregon.  I’ve owned that pack for 8 years now, it has carried my rifles up and down mountains, through deserts, in cities, and on several trips across the country.  Despite an abundance of rough use, it keeps holding up to everything I can throw at it.   Despite its durability and good looks, I do have a few issues with the Gunslinger pack.  First, it is a pack for carrying rifles.  Sure, the lower section can be folded in for general pack use, but it adds bulk and weight and just isn’t the same as a regular pack.   Second, the admin pouch section on top seems to have been designed for the pack to be opened with the pack oriented upright.  Unzipping the admin pouch with the pack laid flat on the ground (where it usually is when I access the admin pouch) usually results gear dumping out everywhere.   So it was that while browsing the Eberlestock page I came upon their Little Brother pack.  This pack offers the option of mating up to Eberlestock’s A4SS weapon carrier and an optional hip belt.  I was immediately interested, as this pack offered the traditional quality and durability of Eberlestock gear, along with a modular design enabling it to meet a variety of needs with or without a long gun.

The little brother pack itself weighs 4 pounds and can hold 1800 cubic inches of gear. Not only can it accept the A4SS weapon carrier, but can also be used as a zip-on module to Eberlestock’s J79 Skyframe 2 pack.

 

It is equipped with PALS webbing inside and out. The main compartment can be accessed from the top or back and the admin pouch zipper is oriented such that gear doesn’t spill out when it is unzipped.

 

I like that the Eberlestock Little Brother Pack can be used as a standalone 3-day pack either with…

 

…or without the optional hip belt.

 

The A4SS weapon carrier can accept long guns up to 60″ in length. The weapon carrier pack is well padded to protect the firearm and cushion protrusions for comfort. Slim profile long guns slide in easily, but the pack is adjustable to accommodate bulkier guns.

 

The Eberlestock Little Brother Pack equipped with weapon carrier rides comfortably and securely, even with an additional 20 pounds of chassis-stocked, bull-barreled, suppressed .308 hitching a ride.

As I said,  I am already a fan of Eberlestock gear,  they just make good stuff, and they are good people.  I really like the modular nature of the Little Brother pack and the ability to use it as a lightweight day pack, a more substantial 3-day pack, or a pack and weapon carrier.  For folks who like to have a bug out or get home bag, this definitely has plenty of room and versatility.  The ability to add a long arm, whether that is a carbine, scattergun, lever gun, or bolt action scoped rifle, is a great feature.   For precision rifle competitors, it is a convenient way to carry rifle, ammo, support gear, water, and anything else needed for a day in the field.  I have used my Eberlestock Gunslinger pack for this purpose on several occasions, I fully expect the Little Brother Pack with Weapon Carrier will serve this purpose equally well, if not better.   For spotters, unzippering the weapon carrier section of the pack gives room for a tripod and spotting scope instead of a rifle.

RATINGS:

Value: 5 out of 5 – Eberlestock gear isn’t cheap, but it is quite reasonably priced considering the quality of the materials and workmanship

Durability: 5 out of 5 – Heavy duty construction that will tolerate rough field use

User Friendliness: 4.0 out of 5 – Moving the zipper location on the admin pouch prevents gear from dumping out, which is nice.  PALS webbing inside and out allows for the addition and organization of gear.  The only thing I ran into as a slight difficulty was the plastic buckles on some of the webbing hanging up stubbornly while attempting to slide the rifle carrier into the pack.  The pack also doesn’t come with instructions or suggestions for use, which leaves the owner guessing on the intended purpose of some snaps and zippers.  On the other hand, with a little use, most people should be able to configure the pack in a way that works best for them.

Comfort: 4.5 out of 5 – The Little Brother pack rides fairly comfortably with some adjustment.  It is reasonably light-weight but has enough volume that users may be tempted to pack it a little too heavily.

Options:  5 out of 5 – The modular nature of the Little Brother pack means it can be configured in several ways depending on the use or mission.

TOTAL: 94% Excellent 

I unreservedly recommend this pack for those looking for a modular solution to carrying their gear.

*I received this product as a courtesy from the manufacturer via Spotter Up so I could test it and give my honest feedback. I am not bound by any written, verbal, or implied contract to give this product a good review. All opinions are my own and are based off my personal experience with the product.

*The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the original authors and contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Spotter Up Magazine, the administrative staff, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

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About The Author

Writer Michael Lake is a Benefactor Life Member of the National Rifle Association and has been actively involved in a variety shooting activities since 1989. In addition to being a certified range safety officer he holds several NRA instructor ratings and armorer certifications. He has received training from the US Army Marksmanship Unit, the US Marine Corps Rifle Team and some of the finest private training facilities in the nation. In 2013 Michael co-founded Adaptive Defense Concepts, a Northwest Ohio-based Training organization. He is currently a contractor for the US Department of Energy, an instructor for Badlands Tactical Training Center, and is an accomplished Freemason.

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