Wed. Aug 5th, 2020

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Poetry: Seppuku We Die Every Day

1 min read

Have you ever dropped your gaze at a man approaching
Have you ever fought the fear that was encroaching
Have you ever
Have you ever
Have you ever strode naked without your vices
Have you ever walked without armor and your devices
Have you ever
Have you ever
Fists hanging at their side
Men die within every single time
Have you ever
Have you ever

~by Michael Kurcina

TODAY choose to be courageous. Whatever ails you, whatever you failed at, leave it in the past. Issues-Move with strength, speed and conviction. Maneuver through it or around it or destroy it.

Seppuku, (Japanese: “self-disembowelment”)also called hara-kiri, also spelled harakiri, the honourable method of taking one’s own life practiced by men of the samurai (military) class in feudal Japan. The word hara-kiri (literally, “belly-cutting”), though widely known to foreigners, is rarely used by Japanese, who prefer the term seppuku (written in Japanese with the same two Chinese characters but in reverse order).

There were two forms of seppuku: voluntary and obligatory. Voluntary seppuku evolved during the wars of the 12th century as a method of suicide used frequently by warriors who, defeated in battle, chose to avoid the dishonour of falling into the hands of the enemy. Occasionally, a samurai performed seppuku to demonstrate loyalty to his lord by following him in death, to protest against some policy of a superior or of the government, or to atone for failure in his duties.